Well, it’s been a long
Been a long
Been a long day…
— How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying by Frank Loesser

playbill:

TODAY IN THEATRE HISTORY: In 1964, the musical Fiddler on the Roof opens at the Imperial Theatre. Sholem Aleichem’s milkman whose glass is half-full, Tevye, is played by Zero Mostel. Mostel would become a star after this run, even though he was not the first choice for the role. Bea Arthur and Maria Karnilova co-star in this Jerry Bock & Sheldon Harnick musical with such memorable songs as “Matchmaker, Matchmaker” and “Sunrise, Sunset.”

For more on the original Broadway production of Fiddler on the Roof, including a look inside the show’s opening night Playbill, visit PlaybillVault.com.

chromolume:

Okay I agree that this is garbage but I saw Elaine Paige live and it was Earth-shattering.
Really? I haven’t ever heard great things about it, and it’s a low point of the cast album. But of course I haven’t seen it live, so I can’t really say anything about her performance with confidence.

I saw Elaine do the role in DC. The direction was lacking on the simple level of blocking but she sang and acted the heck out of it in spite of that.

sallydurantplummer1941:

squarecutorpearshape:

sallydurantplummer1941:

pattilupwns:

Guys.  I think Betty might have been the best Norma of all time.

Even better than Glenn.

I mean, Patti’s Final Night is Perfection

This isn’t like even a think thing with me.

Buckley is the best Norma bar NONE. 

I will stand by Patti, all alone. The songs don’t sound as exciting with the lowered keys. And no one can sing them like Patti!

NOT AS EXCITING?! ARE YOU KDDING ME?!

http://youtu.be/_c5Xovcjp00

7:55 through 8:56.

Also, I’ll take this opportunity to point out 6:06 (and the material right before and after) when she actually does what she sings and isn’t in a hurry and take a bloody moment to collect herself.

I just feel like Patti’s performance lacks the simple nuance and high showmanship that Betty’s has that actually speak to the manic depressive/delusions of Norma Desmond.

sixpenceee:

here’s something to lighten up your mood !


So, this is a 1963 abecedarian book “for children” called The Gashlycrumb Tinies by Edward Gorey. Notice the way in which the children die. It appeals to the paranoia and anxieties of parenting rather than to the fears of children. The couplet rhyming scheme gives it that sense of ridicule and absurdity. At the same time, the use of the dactyl, common in Classical Greek elegies - which gives it that sense of severity and grimness. So, the form of the poetry reflects that subject matter. As Stephen Sondheim says, “Content dictates form. Form dictates content.”

sixpenceee:

here’s something to lighten up your mood !

So, this is a 1963 abecedarian book “for children” called The Gashlycrumb Tinies by Edward Gorey. Notice the way in which the children die. It appeals to the paranoia and anxieties of parenting rather than to the fears of children. The couplet rhyming scheme gives it that sense of ridicule and absurdity. At the same time, the use of the dactyl, common in Classical Greek elegies - which gives it that sense of severity and grimness. So, the form of the poetry reflects that subject matter.

As Stephen Sondheim says, “Content dictates form. Form dictates content.”

(via dontkare-n)

classicpenguin:

And what be a pirate’s favorite book? ARRRRRRISTOTLE. MARRRRRRCEL PROUST. HANNAH ARRRRRRRENDT.

Ah we jest, ye vagabonds, but arrrrrrrrrrr you in need of a good Talk Like A Pirate Day read?

Listen up buckos! We’ve pillaged across the seven seas to bring you scallywags the best of our buried treasure. So batten down the hatches, because this literary storm is a – brewin’. Landlubbers best be stayin’ on shore, or ye’ll surely walk the plank.

Weigh anchor and hoist the mizzen, here arrrrrrrr some favorites:

CAPTAIN BLOOD by Rafael Sabatini

Blimey! A swashbuckling romp with a buccaneer leader if there ever was one. But aye, he’s a good man through and through, not a bilge-sucking scurvy dog.

ROBINSON CRUSOE by Daniel Defoe

Noble pirates! Warms us to the brisket to see a buccaneer save the day. Dead men tell no tales, and without pirates, Crusoe would be down with Davy Jones today.

TREASURE ISLAND by Robert Louis Stevenson  

Grab yer cutlass: the haunting tale of the “Black Spot” is enough to send shivers down yer’ black spine. And if yer wee lads need a movie that isn’t rated ARRRRRRRRR – Muppet Treasure Island is your booty here.

THE WIDOW CHING – PIRATE – Jorge Luis Borges

Lassies can be pirates too. Borges fictionalizes the tale of  fierce female pirate Ching Shih: “a lady pirate who operated in Asian waters, all the way from the Yellow Sea to the rivers of the Annam coast.” Saavy?

THE THREEPENNY OPERA – Bertolt Brecht

Pour out a grog for Pirate Jenny, me lads! “Kill  them now, or later?”

PETER PAN – J. M. Barry

Avast ye, Hook. Aye. Not for all the doubloons in the South Sea would I stand atop a crow’s nest and look upon the man.

CON MEN AND CUTPURSES – Ed. Lucy Moore

All hands hoay! We’re teamin’ with classic sailors in this one – William Kidd, Blackbeard, John Lancey, Edward Trelawney. And even some of the great lady pirates. Anne Bonny and Mary Read: These beauties be fearsome as the day is long!

Aye aye matey, get off your sea legs, drop anchor, and enjoy these classic stories from the sea. Ahoy me hearties!

I love, you, Penguin Publishing.